The Therapeutic Benefit of Cannabis Creams

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This resource has been created to answer the four most common questions surrounding cannabis creams, their common uses and who they can most help. As always, if you have any questions about this resource or anything you read here feel free to drop us a line at info@drkerklaan.com or give us a call 1.866.465.3566  

What are cannabis creams?

    Cannabis creams are infused with Cannabis seed oil, a therapeutic ingredient known for its ability to penetrate the skin. They contain cannabis compounds such as THC or CBD. Nowadays, Cannabis seed oil is commonly used in many skin care products, ranging from lotions, shampoos to light body oils. Depending on the health concern and benefits to offer, different creams vary in the way they are produced and the ingredients used.

    What are they used for? 

    Cannabis creams have a wide range of benefits, from pain relief, tension, sleeping aid, muscle soreness to skin conditions such as acne, rosacea, psoriasis, eczema and pruritus (skin itching). They also provide relief from menstrual cramping and headaches.

    What is the evidence and how do they work?

    Medical marijuana is commonly prescribed to patients for pain management. For those who do not wish to experience the “high”, applying cannabis topically has been shown to reduce muscle aches, chronic pain and inflammation just as effectively. Cannabis creams work by binding to the system of CB2 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the body’s immune cells and their primary function is to reduce inflammation. They can be activated either by the naturally-occurring endocannabinoids or the CBD/THC compounds found in cannabis. The enhanced activation of the endocannabinoid system could help regulate pain by decreasing the body’s inflammatory response and desensitizing pain receptors.[1] For arthritic pain and rheumatism, applying cannabis creams directly to the swollen joints can greatly reduce discomfort and aid in sleeping.

    Besides pain management, the topical application of cannabis has been proven to be an effective therapy in a multitude of skin disorders due to its anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and immunity-modulating properties. It provides great relief from pruritus (skin itching), skin infections, burns, eczema and psoriasis.[2] In psoriasis treatment, cannabinoids show potential benefits by suppressing the two main pathways of psoriatic pathogenesis.[3] Cannabis creams also help control sebum production and reduce redness in people with skin conditions such as acne and rosacea.[4] For burn treatments, applying cannabis topically has been shown to significantly reduce pain and accelerate healing. Moreover, cannabis creams show good tolerability in sensitive skin.

    Are they right for me? 

    Although marijuana is non-toxic and comes with a long list of benefits, not everyone is eager to get the “high” associated with smoking joints or ingesting pot brownies. Cannabis creams are minimally invasive and non-psychoactive, thus making them ideal for people who want all the therapeutic benefits of marijuana without the intense “high”. The topical application of cannabis allows the direct penetration of cannabinoids into the problem area, thus providing a faster, localized relief. For those who are worried about the harmful side effects of prescription painkillers, cannabis creams present a much safer alternative that is suitable for everyone.

    References

    [1] Russo EB. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management. 2008;4(1):245-259.

    [2] The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. (2007, August 17). Cannabis May Help Alleviate Allergic Skin Disease. Web. 

    [3] Norooznezhad, A. H., & Norooznezhad, F. (2017). Cannabinoids: Possible agents for treatment of psoriasis via suppression of angiogenesis and inflammation. Medical Hypotheses, 99, 15-18. Web.

    [4] Ali, A., & Akhtar, N. (2015). The safety and efficacy of 3% Cannabis seeds extract cream for reduction of human cheek skin sebum and erythema content . Pak. J. Pharm. Sci., 28(4), 1389-1395. Web.